Apologies…

This will have to be a very quick entry, since I’m in a bit of a rush right now, but I have a few things to get off my plate for now.

First, I would like to apologize for my lack of blogging in the past week. I’ve been busy with starting the new year off, and the end of the holiday season. I would like to extend a late happy new year to everyone, and I hope that you all had a great celebration with family and friends.

Next, I want to lay out a general schedule which I will follow for my blogging. Like most people, I don’t have all the free time in the world, so for my convenience (and yours), I have decided to post on Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday. These are the easiest days for me to find the time, so I think this blog will work best if I roughly follow this schedule. If anything major occurs, I’ll have to interrupt the “schedule” in order to bring you that news (because of course I am the first source you turn to for baseball news, right?) ;-)

I hope I can follow this schedule, and hopefully some of you will check out my posts on any of those days. I always appreciate it!

Finally, a little baseball news to warm you during the mind-numbing time that is the MLB offseason.

In the wake of the Jason Bay deal, the other marquee slugger on the market, Matt Holliday, announced verbally his plan to resign with the St. Louis Cardinals. Although the contract has not been finalized, it is expected to be a multi-year deal and will apparently surpass Albert Pujols’ 7 yr., $100 million contract as biggest in St. Louis history. Holliday, like Bay, brings great power and is an offensive force to be reckoned with. Although he has shown signs of streakiness in the past, a trio of him, Pujols, and emerging star Ryan Ludwick, as well as other members of the Cardinals well rounded offense, will fortify their team as one to be reckoned with in years to come. Good luck to Holliday and the Cardinals with their decision to resign him.

That’s about it for today, so happy new year! I’ll see you on Thursday.

-AL

Goodbye to a slugger

Good morning to everyone in the MLBlogosphere. I missed posting on the last couple days of MLB news. I was sitting around yesterday thinking about whether there was even enough going on in baseball to make a good post. It was just my luck that when I left the computer in despair, just about the minute after I left, the news broke that Jason Bay had signed a huge deal with the New York Mets (4 yrs., 66 million). My first response to this signing was a feeling of “I-saw-that-coming,” but kind of also “I-can’t-believe-this-is-happening.” How could we lose such a great guy? Jason Bay was almost the perfect ballplayer, in all areas concerning attitude, motivation, respect, etc. And what could Sox fans have needed more than a guy to help us out of the turmoil and controversy caused by the unmotivated, disrespectful slugger known as Manny.

Jason Bay was what Red Sox Nation needed most after the whole Manny era, even if they didn’t realize that. Not only did he play well and deliver when we needed him (not quite Manny level but still very good), but he was loved by fans and respected by all. We knew that he would become a free agent after the 2009 season, and that he would be one of the biggest names on the market, but yet we thought we could hold onto someone that was so great for the team. It turns out it was much harder than we thought, and that the needs of the team now are different than they were back when the Bay move was so essential.

I think the Mets needed Bay more than the Sox did, and Red Sox fans pretty much knew that something like this was coming. The Mets situation was not a good one last year, with their 4 main position player superstars hitting the DL, and even their superstar pitcher not performing quite as well as they had expected. The Mets might have one of the best starting lineups in the league at a glance: Beltran, Wright, Reyes, Delgado, Johan Santana starting on the mound. For some reason, though, this team hasn’t done as well as one would think.

It kind of reminds me of the fictional sports teams I used to think up, with just about every superstar there was. When I asked my dad how he thought they would fare in a real game, he would say that most teams (in most sports) that really succeed aren’t star-studded from the start. Eventually they may become a superstar powerhouse, but only through development of the players and the  original team. Basically, these guys shouldn’t have succeeded.

Although the Mets dilemma is more complicated than that, in a nutshell it could be viewed as several huge stars being put on a team together, and just not really working well. There may be a lack of chemistry, or not enough time to get to know eachother on the field (due to all those DL stints), etc. Whatever it is, Jason Bay seems to be the type of guy that can help. I’m guessing his durability was a key part of the deal, and what he did for the Red Sox with his attitude and character was admirable by any team.

I think this deal will help the Mets in more ways than keeping Bay would have helped the Sox, and I wish him good luck in the Big Apple. We in Boston bid him farewell, and thank him for a good time here.

I’ll see you soon,

-AL

Roger Clemens = Urban Meyer!?

(no, this is not my house, nor did mine look nearly this perfect, LOL)

The last 2 or 3 days in baseball have gone by quietly (as was mostly expected) without any major signings or trades. I took a couple days off from blogging to spend time with my family for Christmas, as I hope everyone else was able to do as well. I hope all of you had a great Christmas holiday, I certainly did. I loved sitting down with my extended family and watching the Celtics play a great game against our  would-be rival, the Orlando Magic, on one of the few days a year we all gather together. I am very thankful for that.

Because of the lack of baseball news, I’m going to use this entry to talk about the other big sports events in the news, as well as anything important that has gone on in my life during the past 3 days.

Firstoff, another week of NFL football capped off today, excepting the Monday and Sunday night games. Just 20 minutes ago, I had the pleasure of seeing my favorite NFC team, the Eagles, beat Josh McDaniels’ Broncos on a field goal with 4 seconds remaining. I adress them as “Josh McDaniels’ Broncos,” because part of the satisfaction from this win is seeing a loss for a young hothead coach who ran up and down the sidelines celebrating after beating my Patriots earlier in the season. Mr. McDaniels, justice is served.

Speaking of the Pats, they played one of the best games of football I’ve seen out of them this year, beating the Jaguars 35-7 and clinching the AFC East. It’s quite a relief, as just a week ago the Dolphins and Jets were breathing down our necks.

The Indianapolis Colts also took a surprising loss to the Jets, ending their quest for an undefeated season. Additionally, the Saints, the only other undefeated team before their loss last week, fell in overtime to the Buccaneers. It’s interesting that this offensive juggernaut of a team struggles so greatly when facing sub-par teams like the Redskins, Buccaneers, and Falcons, all of whom gave them very close games in the past 4 weeks. Strange how each team has its kryptonite.

More big sports news came yesterday evening, as longtime Florida University football coach Urban Meyer announced his retirement from the helm. Meyer has been dominant as a coach for his entire career in the NCAA, and is the winningest active coach (percentage-wise) with one team, as seen below (stats courtesy of espn.com).

Coach School Record Win pct.
Urban Meyer Florida 95-18 .841
Pete Carroll USC 96-19 .835
Bob Stoops Oklahoma 116-29 .800
Mark Richt Georgia 89-27 .767
Gary Patterson TCU 85-27 .759

 Meyer’s decision to retire was analyzed here; heart conditions and intense stress were cited as major factors in the decision. Tim Tebow and several other players reportedly cried when Meyer announced his decision, however Meyer had planned to coach Florida in the Sugar Bowl against Cincinnati on New Year’s Day. Florida’s athletic director, Jeremy Foley, said last night that he believed there was no chance Meyer would change his mind on this decision.

However, today news broke that Meyer had pulled a Roger Clemens/Brett Favre, and had changed his mind about retiring (I think that Urban Meyer, despite the connection to Clemens, possesses some good qualities Clemens certainly didn’t and his decision should be significantly less controversial than Clemens’, if at all). He is instead taking an indefinite leave of absence, but will coach Florida in the Sugar Bowl and plans to be ready to coach once more next season. Coming out of retirement seems to be a real fad for sports figures these days, and some would say it’s a disturbing one. I personally don’t always mind it. If a guy thinks he has enough left in the tank to really put on a show (e.g. Favre), it’s one that I wouldn’t mind watching. Who knows, Meyer could be coaching Florida in the BCS Championship next year around this time.

 Going back to the NFL, I found a very interesting poll on the front page of espn.com. It’s a tough one to answer, and I’d be interested to see what you think on this matter, as it relates well to a situation many baseball managers face late in the season. Vote or just check it out here.

My final suggestion for some sports related stuff to check out comes in the form of a year in review piece, which are popping up all over the web as 2009 comes to a close. The New York Times and nytimes.com summed up “The Year in Pictures” here, and some sports shots made the cut. It’s a nice review to what has been a very eventful year.

I hope everyone has a nice evening, I hope to find the time to post tomorrow. See you then.

-AL 

Be gone, Jeter haters

angry guy.jpgBefore I get to the hot stove news, I want to mention something that made me a little angry yesterday. I received my weekly issue of Sports Illustrated, and I was excited to read their summary of the past decade in sports (which, by the way, was really great; you can check it out here). I usually read SI roughly cover to cover, skipping anything that I don’t really find interesting. Because of this habit of mine, I normally start with the letters in the front that readers from all over the country send in. There’s usually at least one ridiculously stupid bonehead to be found in here, someone who doesn’t know how to put what is fair and makes sense in front of their personal biases.

For example, take this letter from Blake Lyman in the Dec. 21, 2009 issue:

“Even NASCAR’s Jimmie Johnson could run himself into Heisman contention like Mark Ingram has if he were running behind Alabama’s offensive line.”

Mr. Lyman, Jimmie Johnson’s greatest athletic skill is driving a car. Mark Ingram is one of the best college running backs I have ever seen and not only “ran himself into contention” for it, but took home the Heisman award. The fact that he has a good offensive line bears little meaning in his skill, because Mark Ingram is actually known for breaking open field tackles after making it through the front line. I’d be so audacious as to say that Mark Ingram could run himself into Heisman contention behind an offensive line of Jimmie Johnson’s pit crew, but hey, what do I know about that NASCAR stuff.

Derek Jeter, Baseball, New York Yankees

I have many more of these ridiculous and unjustified letters, but two stuck out at me in the most recent issue, commenting on Derek Jeter’s being named Sports Illustrated’s “Sportsman of the Year”. Now, as you’ve seen, I can get heated about many sports, but baseball is the one I’m most passionate about. So when I saw these two letters questioning the decision to name Jeter “Sportsman of the Year” (which I not only agree with but was practically begging for), I got a little angry and I think many of you here on MLBlogs will agree.

Here’s the first one from Dick Kavanaugh:

“Jimmie Johnson should have been named Sportsman of the Year. He and Jeter are solid citizens and both support charitable causes, but Johnson’s winning an unprecedented fourth straight NASCAR title was the most significant sports achievement of 2009.”

Well what do you know, it’s my friend Jimmie Johnson again. I know NASCAR fans get tired of people always saying that it’s just “driving around in circles” and that “it takes no skill.” Well, I’ve heard from many a NASCAR junkie that it does in fact take skill, I’m just yet to find out what this “skill” really is. Enough hating on NASCAR, though, I’ll cut to the chase. The reason I found this letter outrageous was the fact that “Sportsman of the Year” does not consist only of victory and sports acheivement. Although Johnson seems like a very nice guy and also supports many great charitable causes, Jeter so perfectly embodies the qualities a “Sportsman of the Year” must have. Simply put in SI’s own words,

“Jeter is an anachronism if you believe that manners and humility, the pillars of sportsmanship, are losing ground in an increasingly stat-obsessed, self-absorbed sporting culture in which the simple act of making a tackle, dunking a basketball or getting a base hit calls for some burlesque act of celebration, a marking of territory for individual purpose. Jeter is the unadorned star, and not only in the literal sense in that he is free of tattoos, piercings, cussing, posses and the other clichés of the big-time-jock starter kit.”

Not only all that, but Jeter is such a nice guy that he has actually convinced a Red Sox fan like me to not only root for the Yankees on tiny occasions, but to actually support the guy when he’s facing Boston. I mean, Jeter has got to be the most respected player in all of baseball. So no, Mr. Kavanaugh, I do not agree with your argument that Jimmie Johnson, despite his amazing 4th straight NASCAR title is justified. I think Jeter deserved this award hands down.

One more letter criticizing the decision and then I’ll stop my rant. This one’s from a guy named Justin Brown:

“A member of a team that buys championships is your Sportsman? How about a guy who plays on a team with a salary cap? How about the NBA Finals MVP, Kobe Bryant?”

So many things are immature, false, and just totally unjustified about this letter that it’s not even worth commenting on. Clearly this guy just doesn’t know what he’s talking about, because last time I checked Kobe Bryant wasn’t even close to being in contention for “Sportsman of the Year.” And please, enough of the “Yankees buy championships” stuff. What are we, toddlers?! And by golly, Mr. Brown here is from Moorpark, California. Bias? I think so.

Now that I’ve fully exerted my anger, it’s time to mention the latest hot stove news. It was a big couple days for relievers, with three big names moving teams.

Several days ago Darren Oliver signed a 1 yr. contract with the Texas Rangers, the team he started his career with. Last year he went 5-1 with a 2.37 ERA for the Angels. Over the last 4 years he is 19-4 and has made the playoffs every year. These are very good stats, and certainly helped Oliver land the deal with Texas. However, not only has he been good everywhere he’s played in the past years, but he brings experience and good attitude to a decent Texas bullpen. I think this was a great move and might just be a big factor in Texas making a run for the postseason this year.

In part to make up for the loss of Oliver, the Angels signed reliever Fernando Rodney to a 2 yr. deal yesterday. Rodney brings extreme depth to a scary good Angels bullpen, and the 1-2 punch of Rodney and Brian Fuentes will be one to reckon with. Rodney saved 37 of 38 tries, and had a reasonable ERA of 4.40. Fuentes led the majors with 48 saves last year, so Rodney may be shifted to the role of setup man. Because the Angels also have Scot Shields, it will be interesting to see what LA does with their bullpen next year. Either way, it will be a good one.

Finally, the Washington Nationals signed reliever Matt Capps to a 1 yr. deal. Capps had an OK 2009 season, saving 27 of 32 tries with a 3.61 ERA. Capps has shown to be a little inefficient, but he has played well in the past few years and will be a good candidate to lead the Nationals bullpen, which finished a sorry 30th in the league last year, back onto the right track. The Nationals have had a very busy December, and they may continue to improve the bullpen. We’ll see if they’ve “Capp”ed off their busy month yet.

I’ve got to be going now, but I’ll see you soon. Happy Holidays! 

-AL

Begone Jeter Haters

Good morning, bloggers! I hope everyone is doing well and is ready for the holidays.

angry guy.jpgBefore I get to the hot stove news, I want to mention something that made me a little angry yesterday. I received my weekly issue of Sports Illustrated, and I was excited to read their summary of the past decade in sports (which, by the way, was really great; you can check it out here). I usually read SI roughly cover to cover, skipping anything that I don’t really find interesting. Because of this habit of mine, I normally start with the letters in the front that readers from all over the country send in. There’s usually at least one ridiculously stupid bonehead to be found in here, someone who doesn’t know how to put what is fair and makes sense in front of their personal biases.

For example, take this letter from Blake Lyman in the Dec. 21, 2009 issue:

“Even NASCAR’s Jimmie Johnson could run himself into Heisman contention like Mark Ingram has if he were running behind Alabama’s offensive line.”

Mr. Lyman, Jimmie Johnson’s greatest athletic skill is driving a car. Mark Ingram is one of the best college running backs I have ever seen and not only “ran himself into contention” for it, but took home the Heisman award. The fact that he has a good offensive line bears little meaning in his skill, because Mark Ingram is actually known for breaking open field tackles after making it through the front line. I’d be so audacious as to say that Mark Ingram could run himself into Heisman contention behind an offensive line of Jimmie Johnson’s pit crew, but hey, what do I know about that NASCAR stuff.

Derek Jeter, Baseball, New York Yankees

I have many more of these ridiculous and unjustified letters, but two stuck out at me in the most recent issue, commenting on Derek Jeter’s being named Sports Illustrated’s “Sportsman of the Year”. Now, as you’ve seen, I can get heated about many sports, but baseball is the one I’m most passionate about. So when I saw these two letters questioning the decision to name Jeter “Sportsman of the Year” (which I not only agree with but was practically begging for), I got a little angry and I think many of you here on MLBlogs will agree.

Here’s the first one from Dick Kavanaugh:

“Jimmie Johnson should have been named Sportsman of the Year. He and Jeter are solid citizens and both support charitable causes, but Johnson’s winning an unprecedented fourth straight NASCAR title was the most significant sports achievement of 2009.”

Well what do you know, it’s my friend Jimmie Johnson again. I know NASCAR fans get tired of people always saying that it’s just “driving around in circles” and that “it takes no skill.” Well, I’ve heard from many a NASCAR junkie that it does in fact take skill, I’m just yet to find out what this “skill” really is. Enough hating on NASCAR, though, I’ll cut to the chase. The reason I found this letter outrageous was the fact that “Sportsman of the Year” does not consist only of victory and sports acheivement. Although Johnson seems like a very nice guy and also supports many great charitable causes, Jeter so perfectly embodies the qualities a “Sportsman of the Year” must have. Simply put in SI’s own words,

“Jeter is an anachronism if you believe that manners and humility, the pillars of sportsmanship, are losing ground in an increasingly stat-obsessed, self-absorbed sporting culture in which the simple act of making a tackle, dunking a basketball or getting a base hit calls for some burlesque act of celebration, a marking of territory for individual purpose. Jeter is the unadorned star, and not only in the literal sense in that he is free of tattoos, piercings, cussing, posses and the other clichés of the big-time-jock starter kit.”

Not only all that, but Jeter is such a nice guy that he has actually convinced a Red Sox fan like me to not only root for the Yankees on tiny occasions, but to actually support the guy when he’s facing Boston. I mean, Jeter has got to be the most respected player in all of baseball. So no, Mr. Kavanaugh, I do not agree with your argument that Jimmie Johnson, despite his amazing 4th straight NASCAR title is justified. I think Jeter deserved this award hands down.

One more letter criticizing the decision and then I’ll stop my rant. This one’s from a guy named Justin Brown:

“A member of a team that buys championships is your Sportsman? How about a guy who plays on a team with a salary cap? How about the NBA Finals MVP, Kobe Bryant?”

So many things are immature, false, and just totally unjustified about this letter that it’s not even worth commenting on. Clearly this guy just doesn’t know what he’s talking about, because last time I checked Kobe Bryant wasn’t even close to being in contention for “Sportsman of the Year.” And please, enough of the “Yankees buy championships” stuff. What are we, toddlers?! And by golly, Mr. Brown here is from Moorpark, California. Bias? I think so.

Now that I’ve fully exerted my anger, it’s time to mention the latest hot stove news. It was a big couple days for relievers, with three big names moving teams.

Several days ago Darren Oliver signed a 1 yr. contract with the Texas Rangers, the team he started his career with. Last year he went 5-1 with a 2.37 ERA for the Angels. Over the last 4 years he is 19-4 and has made the playoffs every year. These are very good stats, and certainly helped Oliver land the deal with Texas. However, not only has he been good everywhere he’s played in the past years, but he brings experience and good attitude to a decent Texas bullpen. I think this was a great move and might just be a big factor in Texas making a run for the postseason this year.

In part to make up for the loss of Oliver, the Angels signed reliever Fernando Rodney to a 2 yr. deal yesterday. Rodney brings extreme depth to a scary good Angels bullpen, and the 1-2 punch of Rodney and Brian Fuentes will be one to reckon with. Rodney saved 37 of 38 tries, and had a reasonable ERA of 4.40. Fuentes led the majors with 48 saves last year, so Rodney may be shifted to the role of setup man. Because the Angels also have Scot Shields, it will be interesting to see what LA does with their bullpen next year. Either way, it will be a good one.

Finally, the Washington Nationals signed reliever Matt Capps to a 1 yr. deal. Capps had an OK 2009 season, saving 27 of 32 tries with a 3.61 ERA. Capps has shown to be a little inefficient, but he has played well in the past few years and will be a good candidate to lead the Nationals bullpen, which finished a sorry 30th in the league last year, back onto the right track. The Nationals have had a very busy December, and they may continue to improve the bullpen. We’ll see if they’ve “Capp”ed off their busy month yet.

I’ve got to be going now, but I’ll see you soon. Happy Holidays! 

-AL

Awesome!

Good morning bloggers; I hope the weather is nice wherever you are. Maybe there are some of you out there that are having trouble making it home for Christmas because of the recent snowstorms that have swept the country. It’s even possible you were stranded out in Britain because of the shutdown of the Eurostar train system that connects France and Britain by travelling under the English channel. Thousands of passengers were stranded for the past 3 days, including this unhappy crowd.

Luckily, the Eurostar began running again yesterday. For more info, nytimes.com has several articles on the topic, including the one I added the link to.

The Eurostar train shutdown is not the “Awesome-ness” today’s blog title is referring to. No, certainly not, because “Awesome” was in the air last night. I was watching TV last night, and everything was just awesome. Well, not everything, but I’ll get to that in a moment.

I saw that Oprah’s big “Christmas at the White House” special was on, so I gave it a try. First of all, it’s actually pretty interesting and you should check it out. Oprah began her show by touring the main rooms of the White House with first lady Michelle Obama. While I encourage you to watch the special if you are really interested, I will share a couple awesome details.

The gingerbread house was the first thing that caused me to actually exclaim, “Awesomeee…” under my breath. This gargantuan gingerbread treat weighs 390 lbs. (250 of white chocolate and 140 of gingerbread).

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out a video and more info on the gingerbread house here.

The “official” White House Christmas tree was awesome too. Here it is before it was brought from Sheperdstown, West Virginia to our nation’s capital.

christmas tree.jpg

I’d like to see you try to fit that in your living room.

Later, Oprah sat down with President Obama for an interview on the past year and the pressures of the job. On this last topic, Obama actually said that there was “an awesome responsibility with the job.” Amen, Mr. Obama.

Next, I turned on the Jay Leno show. A lot of people make fun of Jay Leno, but on occasion his show can be fun to watch. There’s always the hope that he’ll make some genuinely hilarious joke that never fails to amuse. Last night, he had actress Michelle Rodriguez on for his 10@10 segment, in which he asks a celebrity 10 questions at 10:00 PM (or something like that). Since the celebrities always appear “via sattelite,” one of the best parts of this segment is seeing Jay make a joke, then having to wait for a minute before the person on the TV screen actually laughs at it. And being the impatient guy he is, Jay has already started asking the next question by the time the celebrity starts laughing. It can make for some awkward moments.

I didn’t enjoy the interview with Michelle Rodriguez, which had the promise to be pretty good. She’s funny and nice, not to mention beautiful. However, the whole thing was basically Jay flirting with her and touching on such important topics as ironing clothing on her chest (I’m not making this up, check it out).

 

So Jay Leno wasn’t so awesome, but I thought he was worth mentioning because I have nothing else to talk about, thanks to the shortage of noteworthy baseball news. A couple things that will interest baseball fans (yeah, this is a baseball blog) have surfaced, so here ya go.

If you take a look at the awesome hot stove tracker mlb.com has put up, two big stars still have gaping holes in the “New Team” column: Jason Bay and Matt Holliday. These big dogs are still without teams, but it’s safe to say right now that they won’t be going to the Yankees. GM Brian Cashman has said that signing either of these guys doesn’t fit his budget, so Red Sox fans can rest easy. However, things aren’t looking so great for getting Bay back to Boston either. We will see…

Aroldis Chapman, Cuban phenom pitcher and one of my favorite guys to watch, worked out for 14 MLB teams 2 days ago, and apparently needed only 10 minutes to do his thing. The Marlins are reportedly very interested in getting Chapman. Here’s a bit ESPN did on him and his life.

I have to get going now, so I’ll see you tomorrow. Happy holidays to all.

-AL

Heatin’ Up

It may be cold outside (and snow-covered in just about all of the Northeast and more), but the hot stove of baseball is still heating up.

A couple moves were made from yesterday afternoon until now, and the biggest one affected the Yankees. Whenever the Yankees make a move, Red Sox fans everywhere (that includes me) race to the scene, hungry for another “buying-a-championship” move that we can insult them for. I hate to say it, but we overdo it sometimes. At least we don’t get angry like this kid.

Red-Sox_fan.jpg

This is a pretty famous picture, but I bet you didn’t know that this kid had just found out that this kid had just found out about some outrageous move the Yankees made.

In all seriousness, though, the Yankees made a move that will really change the shape of things for them pitching-wise. They sent Melky Cabrera, pitcher Mike Dunn, and pitcher Arodys Vizcaino as long as cash to the Braves for Javier Vazquez and pitcher Boone Logan. Vazquez is extremely talented and had a very good ’09 season, going 15-10 with a 2.87 ERA. It’s also worth noting that Vazquez was an All-Star with the Yankees in 2004. He can only add to New York’s already stacked rotation, which currently consists of Sabathia, Burnett, and Pettitte with Joba Chamberlain and Phil Hughes waiting in the ranks. Vazquez also happens to be a strikeout machine. Now, most teams have a guy that can strike out the side anyday, but AJ Burnett just happens to be a strikeout stud himself. So the Yanks seem to be left in a pretty good situation after this move. However, it’s not like they didn’t lose anything in this deal. Melky Cabrera, despite his only decent stats last year, actually brought 3 wins to the Yankees, hitting 3 walkoff hits. He wasn’t a superstar, but he had a clear value to the team. 

The Yankees also gave away two pretty good pitching prospects in Vizcaino and Dunn. Vizcaino had a great ’09 season playing class A ball in Staten Island. Apparently, he’s the 3rd best Yankees prospect (according to Baseball America). On a side note, because of the Cabrera move, talks with Nick Johnson and Johnny Damon are likely to heat up even more.

The Nationals also made a deal with veteran pitcher Jason Marquis for a 2 yr. contract. Marquis had a good campaign with the Rockies last year, winning 15 games and making the NL All-Star team. Marquis has won at least 11 games in each of the last 6 years and is expected to serve as a mentor to #1 draft pick Stephen Strasburg, whom the Nationals have very high hopes for. Marquis has 9 years of experience, and to me he seems like a great guy for the job.

Roy Halladay, who was recently dealt to the Phillies from the only team he has pitched for, the Blue Jays, wrote a farewell letter to Blue Jays fans in today’s Toronto Sun. Halladay has always been a highly respected player, both by fans of many teams and by fellow players. In the article, he was extremely gracious and thankful, saying:

 “I am sincerely grateful for the incredible support and compassion the Blue Jays fans have always shown me. I am in awe of your overwhelming passion and devotion.”

The Phillies are very lucky to be getting a guy like Roy, not only for his talent on the field but also for his attitude and manner off it. Good luck to him in the future.

The next time I write on my blog, the hot stove will have gotten even hotter and some more big name players may have moved teams. I’m excited for whatever will happen.

Have a nice day,

-AL

-Javier Vazquez dealt to Yankees 

-Marquis signs with Nationals

-Halladay’s letter to Jays fans

My first post

Hello to all you bloggers on MLBlogs. I’m excited to be joining this great community and I look forward to talking to many of you. I am also really happy to be able to discuss one of my favorite topics with people just as passionate about baseball as I am. My blog will mainly consist of posts several times a week to discuss the events in baseball. If some big name player gets traded, or there was a great game, I’ll talk about that, but I’ll also talk about anything else in the baseball world (if, for some reason, the retired Curt Schilling’s jersey suddenly becomes the top selling item in the MLB store, I will certainly discuss that, and I’ll help you guys wonder why in the world that would ever happen).

 

Anyways, I’ll try to read a lot of other blogs during my free time, and I’ll always comment on them. Thanks in advance to anyone who checks out my blog, I appreciate it.

-AL

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